FROM THE COALITION

Business leaders, philanthropists, engaged students, interested alumni and everyday citizens have weighed in on this debate. Take a look at some of the letters and opinion editorials that these passionate advocates for high-quality higher education have to say about this issue.

Coalition Calls on Legislature to Vote for Texas' Future, Not Shortchange Higher Education

April 04, 2017
Download PDF

Statement on Gov. Abbott's Regent Nominees

January 23, 2017
Download PDF

Five Years Strong, Coalition Sees Ongoing Need to Fight for Quality, Excellence and Investment at Texas Institutions

June 16, 2016
Download PDF

Coalition Statement on Inauguration of UT Austin President Fenves

September 16, 2015
Download PDF

Coalition Responds to Regent Hall Lawsuit

June 24, 2015
Download PDF

Latest Updates

  • The Next Spindletop?

    A recent national survey found that international student enrollment is declining in the U.S. This echoes an earlier study by the Houston Chronicle, which found sharp drops in international enrollment at Texas institutions this fall. In fact, “applications to Texas' four-year public universities plummeted year over year by at least 10,000.” Among the contributing factors, according to the study, were the “social and political climate” in the U.S., as well as visa delays and cost. As reporter Lindsay Ellis noted, “International students pay way more money to attend state schools, boosting campus budgets amid uncertain state appropriations.”

    Continue reading
  • Tax Cuts, Med Schools & Trump Appoints a Texan

    The tax plan unveiled in the U.S. House of Representatives this week includes a number of proposed changes to education tax credits, deductions and benefits that would impact Texans – and especially private universities in Texas with high-dollar endowments. According to a Dallas Morning News review, “schools like SMU in University Park, Texas Christian University in Fort Worth and Rice University in Houston — all with endowments of $1 billion or more — would feel a direct impact.” The schools would be subject to a 1.4 percent excise tax on their net investment income. “In 2014 alone, that trio [of private schools in Texas] would have taken a combined $6.8 million hit.” For students and families, the plan would impact tax credits associated with student loan repayments and would also fold three existing higher-education tax credits into one. The Washington Post published a detailed analysis of the key provisions impacting higher education.

    Continue reading

Share This Page: