FROM THE COALITION

Business leaders, philanthropists, engaged students, interested alumni and everyday citizens have weighed in on this debate. Take a look at some of the letters and opinion editorials that these passionate advocates for high-quality higher education have to say about this issue.

Coalition Calls on Legislature to Vote for Texas' Future, Not Shortchange Higher Education

April 04, 2017
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Statement on Gov. Abbott's Regent Nominees

January 23, 2017
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Five Years Strong, Coalition Sees Ongoing Need to Fight for Quality, Excellence and Investment at Texas Institutions

June 16, 2016
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Coalition Statement on Inauguration of UT Austin President Fenves

September 16, 2015
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Coalition Responds to Regent Hall Lawsuit

June 24, 2015
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Latest Updates

  • True or False?

    True or false: Tuition and fees at Sam Houston State University, the University of Houston, Texas State University and four other public schools in the state exceed the sticker price for the University of Texas at Austin. The answer, surprisingly, is true.” That’s the lead of an Austin American-Statesman piece on tuition and fees at Texas public institutions. UT Austin not only has the lowest tuition of those institutions, but since tuition deregulation has had the lowest percentage increase in tuition. “UT-Dallas is the most expensive of the state’s 38 public universities, with tuition and fees totaling $5,903 for the fall 2016 semester … UT-Austin’s price tag for academic charges was $5,046, eighth-highest. Texas A&M University was fourth-highest at $5,225. … The statewide average was $4,374.” The cost of tuition will be a continued point of interest with lawmakers over the interim and into the next Legislative Session.

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  • How can you save over $20,000 on college costs?

    “How can you save over $20,000 on college costs? Graduate on time.” That’s the analysis from a Wall Street Journal piece this week. Only 40% of full-time students at four-year schools graduate on time, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, part of the U.S. Department of Education. That’s why universities across the country, including UT Austin, are focused on using data to help address the challenge – and find a solution. Using data from academic transcripts and personal records, UT Austin has identified the 25% of students least likely to graduate on time and has enrolled them in the University Leadership Network, which, in addition to requiring students to attend weekly seminars and do internships on campus, incentivizes students for making progress toward their degrees.

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