ON THE DEBATE

Take a look at relevant facts, reports and information that will better inform you about the challenges and opportunities in higher education in Texas, and what's being done to address them.

College "Credit": Reducing Unmanageable Student Debt and Maximizing Return on Education

December 07, 2012
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Is College Affordable? In Search of a Meaningful Definition

July 01, 2012
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University of Texas at Austin Commencement Address 2012

May 22, 2012
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Texas Exes Announce 2012 Distinguished Alumnus Award Honorees

May 08, 2012
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Faculty Senate Resolution Supporting Bowen- Hagler Editorial

May 02, 2012
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Latest Updates

  • 'Robin Hood' for Higher Ed?

    As budget battles in the Legislature heat up, the question of whether or not lawmakers will tap into the Rainy Day Fund continues to be a hot topic of discussion at the capitol – and on the state’s editorial pages. The Eagle this week laid out the case for why lawmakers should access the fund for public and higher education needs, saying the fund should “not be sacrosanct” … “It would be a shame to let our students suffer because of a refusal to dip into the Rainy Day Fund.”

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  • Read my lips: No More Bills

    Friday was the last day for Texas lawmakers to file a bill this legislative session, which brought about an expected flurry of activity. One bill, filed by Rep. J.M. Lozano, would limit higher education benefits for the children of veterans, a controversial issue killed in the 2015 Session. When lawmakers passed the provision (the Hazelwood Act) to allow veterans to pass their benefits to their dependents, it predicted a $10 million price tag – a figure, it turns out, was dramatically underestimated. The cost in 2015 was $178 million and is expected to increase. The state only picks up 20% of the tab, leaving the universities to pay for the rest. Lozano’s bill would limit benefits to veterans who served four years or more, and would expire the benefit 15 years after an honorable discharge, so it would only apply to kids born while their parents were on active duty.

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