ON THE DEBATE

Take a look at relevant facts, reports and information that will better inform you about the challenges and opportunities in higher education in Texas, and what's being done to address them.

College "Credit": Reducing Unmanageable Student Debt and Maximizing Return on Education

December 07, 2012
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Is College Affordable? In Search of a Meaningful Definition

July 01, 2012
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University of Texas at Austin Commencement Address 2012

May 22, 2012
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Texas Exes Announce 2012 Distinguished Alumnus Award Honorees

May 08, 2012
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Faculty Senate Resolution Supporting Bowen- Hagler Editorial

May 02, 2012
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Latest Updates

  • "A workhorse for our nation’s scientists and engineers"

    Saying it was “among our biggest challenges,” this week Texas A&M President Michael K. Young indicated that lowering the faculty-to-student ratio was a top priority. While the institution has experienced tremendous growth in its student body, hiring of faculty has not kept pace. Last fall, Texas A&M’s ratio was 23-to-1. “As a comparison, Young noted the University of Texas had an 18-to-1 ratio -- 23 percent better than A&M -- and the University of Michigan has a 12-to-1 ratio -- 92 percent better than A&M.” Young told The Eagle, “We would like to improve that [ratio] as quickly as we can, but it does take time to hire quality faculty, [and] it is also a tremendous financial challenge.”

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  • Minors, Guns & Affirmative Action

    Race in college admissions was in the headlines again this week when the Justice Department announced it was “preparing to investigate and sue colleges over their affirmative action policies.” UT Austin is “likely well-shielded” from any changes to its admissions policies, since a U.S. Supreme Court decision in 2016 approved of The University’s approach. And, though, most institutions in Texas don’t use affirmative action, those that do employ it may face scrutiny. “Officials at Texas State University and Texas A&M University, for example, said such factors play no role in admissions decisions. However, some schools — notably UT and A&M — go to considerable lengths to recruit applicants from heavily minority areas in Dallas, Houston, the Rio Grande Valley and other parts of the state.”

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