Great isn’t good enough.

This week Gov. Greg Abbott sat down with The Alcalde, the alumni magazine of the Texas Exes, for a wide-ranging interview about the state of higher education in Texas. He discussed innovation, his Governor’s University Research Initiative, the Dell Medical School and the appointment of regents who share his vision of helping UT Austin strive “to be the No. 1 public university in the United States of America.” He also praised recent rankings saying that "those are great numbers" but, he added, "this is Texas and great isn't good enough. We expect to be the best."

Continue Reading

"You are not going to get a job."

This week the Texas House of Representatives took up the topic of college tuition in what was described as a “kinder and gentler” manner than their Senate colleagues. While Committee members expressed concern over costs, they also cited the affordability of community colleges in Texas and noted that while costs are increasing at four year institutions, they are still relatively low overall. “Our two flagships — A&M and UT-Austin — are frequently listed among the best educational bargains in the country," said Raymund Paredes, chairman of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. 

Continue Reading

Do you know what RELLIS means?

This week the editorial pages of Texas newspapers were peppered with commentary about the cost of college and the price of excellence in higher education. In one piece, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick continued his crusade against tuition, criticizing rising costs and praising “low-cost degree options and more flexible course options for students.” In another we had the editorial board of theSan Antonio Express-News acknowledging the importance of “keeping tuition at the state’s institutions of higher education in check” but also reminding readers of the drop in state funding for higher education that has contributed to higher tuition rates and warning that “any retreat from higher education’s needs will damage the state’s future economy.”

Continue Reading

"We are not at War with Universities"

“We are not at war with universities.” That was the message from Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick at this week’s press conference at which he railed against Texas universities over the cost of tuition. Media coverage of the press conference suggested a different message, however, with headlines using phrases such as “bashed” “slams” and “blasts” to describe Patrick’s tone toward the institutions.

Continue Reading

Dual Credit, Hyperloops & Domino's Pizza

New data show high school students enrolled in dual credit programs are not always receiving full credit toward their degree plan once they get to college. According to theAustin American-Statesman, “Researchers said instituting a statewide agreement among higher education institutions specifying the types of courses that must be accepted toward degree plans, and better advising in high school, could mitigate the problem.” While less time in college could ultimately help reduce the cost of a degree, the quality of the dual credit program and how it complement a university’s curriculum must also be taken into consideration.

Continue Reading

Latest Updates

  • Great isn’t good enough.

    This week Gov. Greg Abbott sat down with The Alcalde, the alumni magazine of the Texas Exes, for a wide-ranging interview about the state of higher education in Texas. He discussed innovation, his Governor’s University Research Initiative, the Dell Medical School and the appointment of regents who share his vision of helping UT Austin strive “to be the No. 1 public university in the United States of America.” He also praised recent rankings saying that "those are great numbers" but, he added, "this is Texas and great isn't good enough. We expect to be the best."

    Continue reading
  • "You are not going to get a job."

    This week the Texas House of Representatives took up the topic of college tuition in what was described as a “kinder and gentler” manner than their Senate colleagues. While Committee members expressed concern over costs, they also cited the affordability of community colleges in Texas and noted that while costs are increasing at four year institutions, they are still relatively low overall. “Our two flagships — A&M and UT-Austin — are frequently listed among the best educational bargains in the country," said Raymund Paredes, chairman of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. 

    Continue reading

Share This Page: