Texas A&M selected best for veterans

 
Military veterans-turned-Aggies have made the best possible college decision, according to a ranking of nearly 1,400 colleges nationwide. Red Raiders aren’t too far behind. Texas A&M University in College Station was named the best school for veterans based on 19 different factors by College Factual, a website that crunches data on higher education to provide numerous rankings.
 
This ranking aims “to help veterans and active duty service members to identify colleges that are likely to be supportive of them and their unique needs,” according to College Factual’s website.The factors considered in the ranking include affordability, veteran population, veteran flexibility, veteran policies, veteran resources and overall college quality.
A&M had 1,213 undergraduate students receiving GI Bill benefits at the time the data was collected and participates in all four federal programs that help set the standards for veteran education, according to College Factual.
 
 
 
 
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Three Texas universities in top world rankings

 
World university rankings are out and Texas has some bragging rights. The University of Texas at Austin, Rice University in Houston and Texas A&M University at College Station were listed in the top 200 public and private universities around the world, according to Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings. They ranked 28, 69 and 141, respectively.
 
Last year, Times Higher Education had the same universities ranked at 27, 65 and 159. The University of Texas at Dallas was listed at 188 that year. But there’s also some sobering news. While the U.S. has more universities in the top 200 than any other country, its universities’ rankings have dropped most drastically. And the U.S. is 13th in “bang for the buck,” pointing out what parents and loan-strapped recent grads say often—higher ed is pricey.
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Texas A&M plans to save $130 million through recommended changes

An administrative review of Texas A&M University conducted by the school's Leadership Steering Committee and carried out by a London-headquartered firm has identified more than $130 million in total funds available to be reallocated back into the university between 2015 and 2019. According to the LSC report, the savings will free up more than $13 million in annual recurring funds and almost $3.5 million in one-time funds for reinvestment into the university's main campus, Health Science Center and Galveston campus.
 
Interim President Mark A. Hussey appointed the six-person leadership committee, chaired by Associate Provost for Strategic Planning Jose Luis Bermudez, in May to evaluate the comprehensive review commissioned by Chancellor John Sharp and carried out by PricewaterhouseCoopers. Hussey stated in an email to A&M faculty and staff Wednesday that he accepted all recommendations made by the committee and will begin implementing them in the coming weeks.
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UT-Austin will admit larger ratio of top students

Beginning in fall 2016, the University of Texas at Austin will automatically admit applicants in the top 8 percent of their graduating classes. For the past two years, those in the top 7 percent have been guaranteed admission. UT-Austin President Bill Powers confirmed the 8 percent automatic admission in a Sept. 9 letter to Texas Education Agency Commissioner Michael Williams and various lawmakers.
 
Of the 12,379 high school admits into the 2014 freshman class, 8,979 were automatically admitted, according to estimates UT-Austin released to the Houston Chronicle. University staff could not estimate how many additional top students would be admitted in 2016. “We do anticipate a larger number of auto-admits when that change goes into effect in 2016, though there is no specific estimate,” said UT-Austin Director of Media Outreach J.B. Bird.
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UT’s Bill Powers touts research, teaching and, for fun, Hellraisers

Bill Powers — whose presidency of the University of Texas has been long, accomplished and periodically controversial — emphasized the basics Monday in his ninth and final state of the university address: research, teaching and random pleasures, such as sitting at athletic events with the Hellraisers, a student group whose members paint their faces and chests.
 
Speaking in a packed ballroom at the Student Activity Center, one of several buildings completed under his watch, Powers made a special point of emphasizing research — not just in the sciences but in the humanities as well.“What would the world be like without Einstein’s work on relativity? I can tell you: We wouldn’t have GPS systems today,” Powers said. “What would the world be like without Watson and Crick’s work on the double-helix geometry of DNA? We wouldn’t have genome sequencing.”
 
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  • Texas A&M selected best for veterans

     
    Military veterans-turned-Aggies have made the best possible college decision, according to a ranking of nearly 1,400 colleges nationwide. Red Raiders aren’t too far behind. Texas A&M University in College Station was named the best school for veterans based on 19 different factors by College Factual, a website that crunches data on higher education to provide numerous rankings.
     
    This ranking aims “to help veterans and active duty service members to identify colleges that are likely to be supportive of them and their unique needs,” according to College Factual’s website.The factors considered in the ranking include affordability, veteran population, veteran flexibility, veteran policies, veteran resources and overall college quality.
    A&M had 1,213 undergraduate students receiving GI Bill benefits at the time the data was collected and participates in all four federal programs that help set the standards for veteran education, according to College Factual.
     
     
     
     
    Continue reading
  • Three Texas universities in top world rankings

     
    World university rankings are out and Texas has some bragging rights. The University of Texas at Austin, Rice University in Houston and Texas A&M University at College Station were listed in the top 200 public and private universities around the world, according to Times Higher Education’s World University Rankings. They ranked 28, 69 and 141, respectively.
     
    Last year, Times Higher Education had the same universities ranked at 27, 65 and 159. The University of Texas at Dallas was listed at 188 that year. But there’s also some sobering news. While the U.S. has more universities in the top 200 than any other country, its universities’ rankings have dropped most drastically. And the U.S. is 13th in “bang for the buck,” pointing out what parents and loan-strapped recent grads say often—higher ed is pricey.
    Continue reading

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