Coalition Statement on Regent Nominees

(January 23, 2017) The Texas Coalition for Excellence in Higher Education today issued the following statement in response to Gov. Greg Abbott’s nomination of new regents to serve on the boards of The University of Texas, Texas A&M and Texas Tech Systems:

“We applaud Governor Abbott on the appointment of outstanding Texans for positions on the Boards of Regents of our state institutions. Those announced today are committed to ensuring excellence in higher education and will continue to push our institutions forward. We urge the Senate Committee on Nominations to move quickly to confirm these nominees so they can get to work for higher education in Texas.”

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